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Coir dust is the spongy, peat like residue from the processing of coconut husks (mesocarp) for coir fibre. Also known as cocopeat, it consists of short fibres (<2cm) around 2% - 13% of the total and cork like particles ranging in size from granules to fine dust.
 
Coir dust is the spongy, peat like residue from the processing of coconut husks (mesocarp) for coir fibre. Also known as cocopeat, it consists of short fibres (<2cm) around 2% - 13% of the total and cork like particles ranging in size from granules to fine dust.
  
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Biochar is a charcoal-like substance that’s made by burning <span title="carbon-based compounds, originally derived from living organisms"> '''organic material'''</span> from <span title="organic matter used as a fuel"> '''biomass'''</span>. The two most common proceesses for producing biochar are pyrolysis and gasification. During pyrolysis, the organic material is heated to 250-800<sup>o</sup>C in a limited oxygen environment. Gasification involves temperatures greater than 700<sup>o</sup>C in the presence of oxygen.
 
Biochar is a charcoal-like substance that’s made by burning <span title="carbon-based compounds, originally derived from living organisms"> '''organic material'''</span> from <span title="organic matter used as a fuel"> '''biomass'''</span>. The two most common proceesses for producing biochar are pyrolysis and gasification. During pyrolysis, the organic material is heated to 250-800<sup>o</sup>C in a limited oxygen environment. Gasification involves temperatures greater than 700<sup>o</sup>C in the presence of oxygen.
  
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*Zhaoa, L., Xinde Caoa, Ondˇrej Maˇsekb, Andrew Zimmerman. 2013. Heterogeneity of biochar properties as a function of feedstock sources and production temperatures. Journal of Hazardous Materials 256– 257:1– 9
 
*Zhaoa, L., Xinde Caoa, Ondˇrej Maˇsekb, Andrew Zimmerman. 2013. Heterogeneity of biochar properties as a function of feedstock sources and production temperatures. Journal of Hazardous Materials 256– 257:1– 9
 
*Zheng, H., Zhenyu Wang, Xia Deng, Stephen Herbert, Baoshan Xing. 2013. Impacts of adding biochar on nitrogen retention and bioavailability in agricultural soil. Geoderma, Volume 206:32-39
 
*Zheng, H., Zhenyu Wang, Xia Deng, Stephen Herbert, Baoshan Xing. 2013. Impacts of adding biochar on nitrogen retention and bioavailability in agricultural soil. Geoderma, Volume 206:32-39
 
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Revision as of 16:25, 6 February 2020

Warning: This page is an edit and testing page use by the wiki authors. It is not a content page for the Manual. Information on this page may not be accurate and should not be used as guidance in managing stormwater.

Coir and applications of coir in stormwater management

Coir

This page provides information on coir. While providing extensive information on coir, there is a section focused specifically on stormwater applications for coir.

Overview and description

image of coir fiber
A close-up view of coir fibre, by Fotokannan, licensed under CC CC BY-NC-SA

Coconut (Cocus nucifera L.) pith or coir, the mesocarp of the fruit, is a waste product that has potential benefits in growth media.

Coir dust is the spongy, peat like residue from the processing of coconut husks (mesocarp) for coir fibre. Also known as cocopeat, it consists of short fibres (<2cm) around 2% - 13% of the total and cork like particles ranging in size from granules to fine dust.






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