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[[File:Narrow street example.jpg|thumb|300px|alt=Photo of Eagle Valley - Woodbury Minnesota example of narrow street|<font size=3>Photo from Woodbury, Minnesota, illustrating an example of a narrow street. Reducing street width reduces the amount of pollution on impermeable surfaces and is therefore an effective pollution prevention practice.</font size>]]
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[[File:Narrow street example.jpg|thumb|300px|alt=Photo of Eagle Valley - Woodbury Minnesota example of narrow street|<font size=3>An example of a narrow street from Woodbury, Minnesota. Reducing street width reduces the amount of pollution on impermeable surfaces and is therefore an effective pollution prevention practice.</font size>]]
  
The 2008 version of the Stormwater Manual (Version 2) contains polution prevention fact sheets for residential, municipal and commercial/industrial land uses. Material from those fact sheets comprises the information contained on this page. To link to the original document in Microsoft Word format, click [[File:Pollution Prevention.docx|here]]. We anticipate eventually including information for specific pollution prevention practices.
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The 2008 version of the Stormwater Manual (Version 2) contains [[Glossary#P|pollution prevention]] (P2) fact sheets for residential, municipal and commercial/industrial land uses. Material from those fact sheets comprises the information contained on this page. To link to the original document in Microsoft Word format, click [[File:Pollution Prevention.docx|here]]. In addition, there is a [http://www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/view-document.html?gid=7480 fact sheet for businesses]. We anticipate eventually including information for specific pollution prevention practices.
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For more information on pollution prevention in general, see [http://www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/topics/preventing-waste-and-pollution/p2-pollution-prevention/index.html MPCA's page on pollution prevention]. The MPCA has also produced a document titled [http://www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/view-document.html?gid=11849 Pollution Prevention and the MS4 Program: A Guide on Utilizing Pollution Prevention Activities to Meet MS4 General Permit Requirements].  This document provides communities regulated under the Minnesota Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems (MS4) General Permit with basic tools and information that will lead to increased use of pollution prevention (P2) activities within stormwater pollution prevention programs (SWPPPs) and local stormwater programs.  
  
 
==Residential Practices==
 
==Residential Practices==
 
Residential pollution prevention practices are household and neighborhood activities that prevent or reduce the contamination of stormwater. Residential pollution prevention practices prevent or reduce stormwater contamination from sources such as yards, driveways, sidewalks, and household products.
 
Residential pollution prevention practices are household and neighborhood activities that prevent or reduce the contamination of stormwater. Residential pollution prevention practices prevent or reduce stormwater contamination from sources such as yards, driveways, sidewalks, and household products.
 
<p>These practices are often simple, low cost behavioral changes that improve subwatershed water quality by minimizing the introduction of pollutants including sediment, nutrients, metals, bacteria, trash, oil, and toxins.</p>
 
<p>These practices are often simple, low cost behavioral changes that improve subwatershed water quality by minimizing the introduction of pollutants including sediment, nutrients, metals, bacteria, trash, oil, and toxins.</p>
<p>Each of these practices are highly suitable and effective in cold climates. Each practice varies in it's ability to control pollutants generated from residential land uses. A variety of methods may be used for each of these practices. See [[Pollution prevention#Photo credits|Photo Credits]] and [[Pollution prevention#References|References]] for further information</p>
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<p>Each of these practices are highly suitable and effective in cold climates. Each practice varies in its ability to control pollutants generated from residential land uses. A variety of methods may be used for each of these practices. See [[Pollution prevention#Photo credits|Photo Credits]] and [[Pollution prevention#References|References]] for further information</p>
  
 
{{:Residential practices pollutant controls}}
 
{{:Residential practices pollutant controls}}
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{{:Residential pollution prevention methods}}
 
{{:Residential pollution prevention methods}}
  
==Municipal Practices==
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[[File:Salt shed.jpg|thumb|300px|alt=Photo of Salt delivery to a Washington County Salt Shed|<font size=3>Salt delivery to a Washington County salt shed. Note the portion of the operation dealing with salt occurs within an enclosed structure that minimizes exposure of the pollutant to precipitation.</font size>]]
  
[[File:Salt shed.jpg|thumb|300px|alt=Photo of Salt delivery to a Washington County Salt Shed|Photo of Salt delivery to a Washington County Salt Shed]]
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==Municipal practices==
 +
''Municipal pollution prevention practices are public operation and maintenance activities and educational efforts implemented by municipal staff that prevent or reduce the contamination of stormwater.''
 +
 
 +
Municipal pollution prevention practices prevent or reduce stormwater contamination from public sources such as streets, parking areas, maintenance vehicles, storm and sanitary sewers, dumpsters, swimming pools and other potential stormwater hotspots. These practices improve subwatershed water quality by minimizing the introduction of pollutants including sediment, nutrients, metals, bacteria, trash, oil, and toxins. Each of these practices is highly suitable and effective in cold climates. The following tables indicate there is wide variability in the pollutants controlled by various municipal pollution prevention practices and in the methods used for each of these practices. Some of these practices are effective in controlling pollutants from [[Potential stormwater hotspots|potential stormwater hotspots]].
  
<p>''Municipal pollution prevention practices are public operation and maintenance activities and educational efforts implemented by municipal staff that prevent or reduce the contamination of stormwater.''</p>
 
  
Municipal pollution prevention practices prevent or reduce stormwater contamination from public sources such as streets, parking areas, maintenance vehicles, storm and sanitary sewers, dumpsters, swimming pools and other potential stormwater hotspots. These practices improve subwatershed water quality by minimizing the introduction of pollutants including sediment, nutrients, metals, bacteria, trash, oil, and toxins. Each of these practices is highly suitable and effective in cold climates. The following tables indicate there is wide variability in the pollutants controlled by various municipal pollution prevention practices and in the methods used for each of these practices. Some of these practices are effective in controlling pollutants from [[Potential stormwater hotspots|potential stormwater hotspots]]. See [[#Photo Credits]] and [[#References]] for further information.
 
  
 
{{:Municipal practices pollutant controls}}
 
{{:Municipal practices pollutant controls}}
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{{:Municipal pollution prevention methods}}
 
{{:Municipal pollution prevention methods}}
  
==Industrial and Commercial Practices==
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==Industrial and commercial practices==
<p>''Industrial and commercial pollution prevention practices are private operation and maintenance activities implemented by owners or individuals responsible for industrial and commercial sites that prevent or reduce the contamination of stormwater. Note that certain industrial activities and sites could be covered under the NPDES Industrial Permit. See Chapter 5 for the Industrial Permit discussion.''</p>
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[[File:Tanks above ground industrial.jpg|thumb|300px|alt=Photo of tanks above ground at industrial site|<font size>Photo of tanks above ground at industrial site</font size>]]
===Key Considerations===
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''Industrial and commercial pollution prevention practices are private operation and maintenance activities implemented by owners or individuals responsible for industrial and commercial sites that prevent or reduce the contamination of stormwater. Note that certain industrial activities and sites could be covered under the [http://www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/water/water-types-and-programs/stormwater/industrial-stormwater/index.html NPDES Industrial Permit].''
 +
 
 +
Industrial and commercial pollution prevention practices prevent or reduce stormwater contamination from concentrated impervious surfaces and potential stormwater hotspots such as streets, parking areas, vehicles, smokestacks, and dumpsters. These practices improve subwatershed water quality by minimizing the introduction of pollutants including sediment, nutrients, metals, bacteria, trash, oil, and toxins. The tables below indicate there is a wide variation in the pollutants controlled by various industrial and commercial pollution prevention practices and wide variation in some of the methods used for each of these practices. Some of these BMPs may be effective for controlling pollutant loading from [[Potential stormwater hotspots|potential stormwater hotspots.
  
[[File:Tanks above ground industrial.jpg|thumb|300px|alt=Photo of tanks above ground at industrial site|Photo of tanks above ground at industrial site]]
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[http://www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/water/water-types-and-programs/stormwater/industrial-stormwater/comply-with-the-2010-industrial-stormwater-permit.html Link to Sector-specific fact sheets]
  
<p>Industrial and commercial pollution prevention practices prevent or reduce stormwater contamination from concentrated impervious surfaces and potential stormwater hotspots such as streets, parking areas, vehicles, smokestacks, and dumpsters. These practices improve subwatershed water quality by minimizing the introduction of pollutants including sediment, nutrients, metals, bacteria, trash, oil, and toxins. Table 12.PREV.5 indicates the pollutants controlled by various industrial and commercial pollution prevention practices while Table 12.PREV.6 describes some of the methods used for each of these practices. See Chapter 13 for further discussion of potential stormwater hotspots. See Photo Credits and References for further information.</p>
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See [[#Photo Credits|Photo Credits]] and [[#References|References]] for further information.
  
 
{{:Industrial & Commercial practices pollutant controls}}
 
{{:Industrial & Commercial practices pollutant controls}}
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[[File:Storm sewer stenciling.jpg|thumb|300px|alt=photo of storm sewer stenciling|<font size=3>Photo of storm sewer stenciling</font size>]]
 
[[File:Storm sewer stenciling.jpg|thumb|300px|alt=photo of storm sewer stenciling|<font size=3>Photo of storm sewer stenciling</font size>]]
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==Construction practices==
 +
Fact sheets
 +
*[http://www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/view-document.html?gid=7419 Vehicle tracking]
 +
*[http://www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/view-document.html?gid=7420 Perimeter control]
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*[http://www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/view-document.html?gid=7421 Site stabilization]
 +
*[http://www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/view-document.html?gid=7422 Inlet protection]
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*[http://www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/view-document.html?gid=7423 SWPPP]
  
 
==Photo credits==
 
==Photo credits==
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#Courtesy of the Town of Amherst, New York
 
#Courtesy of the Town of Amherst, New York
 
#Courtesy of the United States Geological Survey
 
#Courtesy of the United States Geological Survey
#All other photos from EOR
+
#All other photos from Emmons and Olivier Resources
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
  
  
[http://www.georgiastormwater.com/ Atlanta Regional Commission. Georgia Stormwater Management Manual]
+
*Atlanta Regional Commission. [http://www.georgiastormwater.com/ Georgia Stormwater Management Manual]
 
+
*California Stormwater Quality Association. [http://www.cabmphandbooks.com Stormwater Best Management Practice Handbooks]
[http://www.cabmphandbooks.com California Stormwater Quality Association. Stormwater Best Management Practice Handbooks]
+
*Center for Watershed Protection. [http://www.cwp.org/ Urban Subwatershed Restoration Manual, Manual 8: Pollution Source Control Practices.]
 
+
*Center for Watershed Protection. [http://www.stormwatercenter.net/Assorted%20Fact%20Sheets/Tool8-Stewardship/residential.htm Fact Sheets on Residential Pollution Prevention Practices]
[http://www.cwp.org/ Center for Watershed Protection. Urban Subwatershed Restoration Manual, Manual 8: Pollution Source Control Practices.]
+
*[http://www.co.dakota.mn.us/Environment/EducationResources/Pages/default.aspx Dakota County Environmental Education]
 
+
*Government of Ontario, Canada. [http://www.ene.gov.on.ca/envision/water/stormwaterpph.htm Stormwater Pollution Prevention Handbook]
[http://www.stormwatercenter.net/Assorted%20Fact%20Sheets/Tool8-Stewardship/residential.htm Center for Watershed Protection. Fact Sheets on Residential Pollution Prevention Practices]
+
*[http://www.hennepin.us/environmentaleducation Hennepin County Environmental Education]
 
+
*Office of the Revisor of Statutes, State of Minnesota.[http://www.revisor.leg.state.mn.us/stats/ Minnesota Statutes 2004]
[http://www.co.dakota.mn.us/environ/education.htm Dakota County Environmental Education]
+
*[[Road salt, smart salting and winter maintenance]] - Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
 
 
[http://www.ene.gov.on.ca/envision/water/stormwaterpph.htm Government of Ontario, Canada. Stormwater Pollution Prevention Handbook]
 
 
 
[http://www.co.hennepin.mn.us/vgn/portal/internet/hcchannelmaster/0,2324,1273_83263__2,00.html Hennepin County Environmental Education]
 
 
 
[http://www.revisor.leg.state.mn.us/stats/ Office of the Revisor of Statutes, State of Minnesota. Minnesota Statutes 2004]
 
  
[http://www.oseh.umich.edu/salt.html University of Michigan Occupational Safety and Environmental Health. Winter Maintenance: Snow and Ice Removal]
+
<noinclude>
 +
[[Category:References]]
 +
</noinclude>
 +
<noinclude>
 +
[[Category:Level 3 - Best management practices/Nonstructural practices/Pollution prevention]]
 +
</noinclude>

Latest revision as of 20:12, 18 July 2022

Photo of Eagle Valley - Woodbury Minnesota example of narrow street
An example of a narrow street from Woodbury, Minnesota. Reducing street width reduces the amount of pollution on impermeable surfaces and is therefore an effective pollution prevention practice.

The 2008 version of the Stormwater Manual (Version 2) contains pollution prevention (P2) fact sheets for residential, municipal and commercial/industrial land uses. Material from those fact sheets comprises the information contained on this page. To link to the original document in Microsoft Word format, click File:Pollution Prevention.docx. In addition, there is a fact sheet for businesses. We anticipate eventually including information for specific pollution prevention practices.

For more information on pollution prevention in general, see MPCA's page on pollution prevention. The MPCA has also produced a document titled Pollution Prevention and the MS4 Program: A Guide on Utilizing Pollution Prevention Activities to Meet MS4 General Permit Requirements. This document provides communities regulated under the Minnesota Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems (MS4) General Permit with basic tools and information that will lead to increased use of pollution prevention (P2) activities within stormwater pollution prevention programs (SWPPPs) and local stormwater programs.

Residential Practices

Residential pollution prevention practices are household and neighborhood activities that prevent or reduce the contamination of stormwater. Residential pollution prevention practices prevent or reduce stormwater contamination from sources such as yards, driveways, sidewalks, and household products.

These practices are often simple, low cost behavioral changes that improve subwatershed water quality by minimizing the introduction of pollutants including sediment, nutrients, metals, bacteria, trash, oil, and toxins.

Each of these practices are highly suitable and effective in cold climates. Each practice varies in its ability to control pollutants generated from residential land uses. A variety of methods may be used for each of these practices. See Photo Credits and References for further information


This table shows a review of residential pollution prevention practices and the extent to which they control pollutants. Source: modified from the Center for Watershed Protection.
Link to this table

Practice Stormwater Pollutants Controlled
Sediment Nutrients Metals Bacteria Trash Oil Toxins
Fertilizer and Pesticide Management Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled
Litter and Animal Waste Control Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled
Yard Waste Management Moderately Controlled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolled Slightly Controlled Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled
Household Hazardous Waste Control Uncontrolled Slightly Controlled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled Significantly Controlled
Alternative Product Use Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled
Better Car and Equipment Washing Moderately Controlled Significantly Controlled Moderately Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled
Better Sidewalk and Driveway Cleaning Significantly Controlled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Uncontrolled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Slightly Controlled
Better Sidewalk and Driveway Deicing Moderately Controlled Slightly Controlled Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Moderately Controlled
Proper Pool Discharge Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Slightly Controlled
Septic Tank Maintenance Slightly Controlled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Slightly Controlled
Exposed Soil Repair Significantly Controlled Moderately Controlled Slightly Controlled Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled
Native Landscaping Significantly Controlled Significantly Controlled Slightly Controlled Slightly Controlled Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled
Healthy Lawns Significantly Controlled Moderately Controlled Slightly Controlled Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled


Residential pollution prevention methods.
Link to this table

Practice Method Image
Fertilizer and pesticide management 1 Reduce or eliminate the need for fertilizer and pesticides by practicing natural lawn care, planting native vegetation, and limiting chemical use; follow Minnesota Statutes Chapter 18C and federal regulatory requirements on fertilizer and pesticide storage and application if used.
Fertilizer pesticide management.jpg
Litter and Animal Waste Control 1 Properly dispose of pet waste and litter in a timely manner and according to local ordinance requirements.
Litter animal waste control.jpg
Yard Waste Management 1 Prevent yard waste from entering storm sewer systems and water bodies by either composting or using curbside pickup services and avoiding accumulation of yard waste on impervious surfaces; keep grass clippings and leaves out of the street.
Yard waste management.jpg
Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) Control 1 Ensure that hazardous waste, including paints, stains, solvents, cleaning products, used motor oil, antifreeze, and pesticides, are disposed of properly by participating in a County household hazardous waste collection program; properly store hazardous waste items.
Household hazardous waste.jpg
Alternative Product Use Use less harmful products including alternative cleaning solutions, pesticides, fertilizers, automotive and paint products to reduce the amount of toxic substances released into sewer systems.
Alternative product use.jpg
Better Car and Equipment Washing 1 Wash cars less often and on grassy areas using phosphorus free detergents and non-toxic cleaning products or use commercial car washes to prevent dirty wash water from flowing to storm sewer systems and water bodies.
Better car washing.jpg
Better Sidewalk and Driveway Cleaning 1 Sweep sidewalks and driveways and dispose of sweepings in the trash instead of using hoses or leaf blowers to clean surfaces.
Better sidewalk driveway cleaning.jpg
Better Sidewalk and Driveway Deicing 1 Reduce or eliminate the need for deicing products by manually clearing sidewalks and driveways prior to deicer use; use environmentally-friendly deicing products when possible, apply sparingly and store properly if used.
Better sidewalk driveway deicing.jpg
Proper Pool Discharge 1 Check local ordinances for pool water discharge requirements; pool water should be discharged to sanitary sewer systems or held for a week or more without addition of chlorine prior to spreading over pervious areas to prevent stormwater contamination.
Proper pool discharge household.jpg
Exposed Soil Repair 1 Use native vegetation or grass to cover and stabilize exposed soil on lawns to prevent sediment wash off.
Exposed soil repair.jpg
Native Landscaping Reduce turf areas by planting native species to reduce and filter pollutant-laden runoff and prevent the spread of invasive, non-native plant species into the storm sewer system.
Native landscaping.jpg
Healthy Lawns Maintain thick grass planted in organic-rich soil to a height of at least 3 inches to prevent soil erosion, filter stormwater contaminants, and absorb airborne pollutants; limit or eliminate chemical use and water and repair lawn as needed
Healthy lawns.JPG


Photo of Salt delivery to a Washington County Salt Shed
Salt delivery to a Washington County salt shed. Note the portion of the operation dealing with salt occurs within an enclosed structure that minimizes exposure of the pollutant to precipitation.

Municipal practices

Municipal pollution prevention practices are public operation and maintenance activities and educational efforts implemented by municipal staff that prevent or reduce the contamination of stormwater.

Municipal pollution prevention practices prevent or reduce stormwater contamination from public sources such as streets, parking areas, maintenance vehicles, storm and sanitary sewers, dumpsters, swimming pools and other potential stormwater hotspots. These practices improve subwatershed water quality by minimizing the introduction of pollutants including sediment, nutrients, metals, bacteria, trash, oil, and toxins. Each of these practices is highly suitable and effective in cold climates. The following tables indicate there is wide variability in the pollutants controlled by various municipal pollution prevention practices and in the methods used for each of these practices. Some of these practices are effective in controlling pollutants from potential stormwater hotspots.


Municipal pollution prevention practices and the extent to which pollutants are controlled by that practice. (Source: modified from the Center for Watershed Protection).
Link to this table

Practice Stormwater Pollutants Controlled
Sediment Nutrients Metals Bacteria Trash Oil Toxins
Temp. Construction Sediment Control Significantly Controlled Moderately Controlled Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled
Wind Erosion Control Significantly Controlled Moderately Controlled Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled
Streambank Stabilization Significantly Controlled Moderately Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled
Material Storage Control Significantly Controlled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled Significantly Controlled
Dumpster and Landfill Management Slightly Controlled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Significantly Controlled Significantly Controlled Moderately Controlled Significantly Controlled
Proper Pool Discharge Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled
Better Turf Management Moderately Controlled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled
Better Street and Parking Lot Cleaning Significantly Controlled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Uncontrolled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Slightly Controlled
Better Street and Parking Lot Deicing Moderately Controlled Slightly Controlled Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled
Proper Vehicle Management Significantly Controlled Significantly Controlled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolled Moderately Controlled Significantly Controlled Significantly Controlled
Storm Sewer System Maintenancer Significantly Controlled Moderately Controlled Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Moderately Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled
Sanitary Sewer System Maintenance Slightly Controlled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolledd Uncontrolled Slightly Controlled
Litter and Animal Waste Control Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled
Public Educations Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled
Staff and Employee Educations Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled


Municipal pollution prevention methods.
Link to this table

Practice Method Image
Temporary Construction Sediment Control Implement and encourage practices to retain sediment within construction project area; see Temporary Construction Erosion and Sediment Control Factsheets for additional information
Temporary construction sediment control.jpg
Wind Erosion Control Institute a local program for wetting of open construction surfaces and other sources for windblown pollutants.
Wind erosion control.jpg
Streambank Stabilization Repair erosion occurring on a streambank of lakeshore in a timely manner; inspect bank areas for ice damage in the spring.
Streambank stabilization.jpg
Material Storage Control 1 Reduce or eliminate spill and leakage loss by properly inspecting, containing, and storing hazardous materials and having a cleanup plan that can be quickly and efficiently implemented.
Material storage control.jpg
Dumpster and Landfill Management Ensure that contaminated material is contained to prevent solid and/or liquid waste from being washed into storm sewer systems or water bodies.
Dumpster and landfill management.JPG
Proper Pool Discharge 1 Discharge pool water to sanitary sewer systems or hold for a week or more without the addition of chlorine prior to spreading over pervious areas instead of draining water directly to storm sewer systems. Follow local ordinances.
Proper pool discharge municipal.jpg
Better Turf Management 1 Ensure that mowing, fertilization, pesticide application, and irrigation are completed in ways that will prevent or reduce grass clippings, sediment, and chemicals from entering storm sewer systems; use native vegetation where possible.
Better turf management.jpg
Better Street and Parking Lot Cleaning 1 Maintain streets and parking lots frequently and especially in the spring by sweeping, picking up litter, and repairing deterioration; pressure wash pavement only as needed and avoid using cleaning agents.
Better street parking lot cleaning.jpg
Better Street and Parking Lot Deicing Properly store and conservatively apply salt, sand, or other deicing substances in order to prevent excessive and/or unnecessary contamination; implement anti-icing and prewet salt techniques for increased deicing efficiency.
Better street parking lot deicing.jpg
Proper Vehicle Management 1 Ensure that vehicles are fueled, maintained, washed and stored in a manner that prevents the release of harmful fluids, including oil, antifreeze, gasoline, battery acid, hydraulic and transmission fluids, and cleaning solutions.
Proper vehicle management.jpg
Storm Sewer System Maintenance Regularly clean debris from storm sewer inlets, remove sediment from catch basin sumps, and remove any illicit connections to storm sewer systems.
Storm sewer system maintenance.jpg
Litter and Animal Waste Control 1 Mandate litter and pet waste cleanup within the community and control waste-generating wildlife, such as geese; provide waste containers for litter and pet waste in public areas.
Litter animal waste control.jpg
Public Education Label storm drains to indicate that no dumping is allowed and institute pollution prevention programs to educate and implement needed community practices.
Public education.jpg
Staff, Employee, and Volunteer Education Provide internal training for staff and provide direction to hired employees or volunteers regarding pollution prevention techniques to be used during work activites.
Staff employee volunteer education.jpg


Industrial and commercial practices

Photo of tanks above ground at industrial site
Photo of tanks above ground at industrial site

Industrial and commercial pollution prevention practices are private operation and maintenance activities implemented by owners or individuals responsible for industrial and commercial sites that prevent or reduce the contamination of stormwater. Note that certain industrial activities and sites could be covered under the NPDES Industrial Permit.

Industrial and commercial pollution prevention practices prevent or reduce stormwater contamination from concentrated impervious surfaces and potential stormwater hotspots such as streets, parking areas, vehicles, smokestacks, and dumpsters. These practices improve subwatershed water quality by minimizing the introduction of pollutants including sediment, nutrients, metals, bacteria, trash, oil, and toxins. The tables below indicate there is a wide variation in the pollutants controlled by various industrial and commercial pollution prevention practices and wide variation in some of the methods used for each of these practices. Some of these BMPs may be effective for controlling pollutant loading from [[Potential stormwater hotspots|potential stormwater hotspots.

Link to Sector-specific fact sheets

See Photo Credits and References for further information.

Industrial & commercial pollution prevention practices and the extent to which they control pollutant loading.
Link to this table

Practice Stormwater Pollutants Controlled
Sediment Nutrients Metals Bacteria Trash Oil Toxins
Temp. Construction Sediment Control Significantly Controlled Moderately Controlled Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled
Wind Erosion Control Significantly Controlled Moderately Controlled Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled
Emission Regulation Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled
Material Storage Control Significantly Controlled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled Significantly Controlled
Dumpster and Landfill Management Slightly Controlled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Significantly Controlled Significantly Controlled Moderately Controlled Significantly Controlled
Better Turf Management Moderately Controlled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled
Better Parking Lot Cleaning Significantly Controlled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Uncontrolled Moderately Controlled Moderately Controlled Slightly Controlled
Better Impervious Surface Deicing Moderately Controlled Slightly Controlled Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled
Proper Vehicle Management Significantly Controlled Significantly Controlled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolled Moderately Controlled Significantly Controlled Significantly Controlled
Storm Sewer System Maintenancer Significantly Controlled Moderately Controlled Slightly Controlled Uncontrolled Moderately Controlled Uncontrolled Uncontrolled
Sanitary Sewer System Maintenance Slightly Controlled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolled Significantly Controlled Uncontrolledd Uncontrolled Slightly Controlled


Industrial & commercial pollution prevention methods.
Link to this table

Practice Method Image
Temporary Construction Sediment Control Implement and encourage practices to retain sediment within construction project area; see Temporary Construction Erosion and Sediment Control Factsheets for additional information
Temporary construction sediment control.jpg
Wind Erosion Control Institute a local program for wetting of open construction surfaces and other sources for windblown pollutants.
Wind erosion control.jpg
Emission Regulation 1 Follow local, state and federal regulatory requirements for control of air emissions.
Emission regulation.jpg
Material Storage Control 1 Reduce or eliminate spill and leakage loss by properly inspecting, containing, and storing hazardous materials and having a cleanup plan that can be quickly and efficiently implemented.
Material storage control.jpg
Dumpster and Landfill Management Ensure that contaminated material is contained to prevent solid and/or liquid waste from being washed into storm sewer systems or water bodies.
Dumpster and landfill management.JPG
Better Turf Management 1 Ensure that mowing, fertilization, pesticide application, and irrigation are completed in ways that will prevent or reduce grass clippings, sediment, and chemicals from entering storm sewer systems; use native vegetation where possible.
Better turf management.jpg
Better Parking Lot Cleaning 1 Maintain streets and parking lots frequently and especially in the spring by sweeping, picking up litter, and repairing deterioration; pressure wash pavement only as needed and avoid using cleaning agents.
Better street parking lot cleaning.jpg
Better Impervious Surface Deicing 1 Properly store and conservatively apply salt, sand, or other deicing substances in order to prevent excessive and/or unnecessary contamination; implement anti-icing and prewet salt techniques for increased deicing efficiency.
Better street parking lot deicing.jpg
Proper Vehicle Management 1 Ensure that vehicles are fueled, maintained, washed and stored in a manner that prevents the release of harmful fluids, including oil, antifreeze, gasoline, battery acid, hydraulic and transmission fluids, and cleaning solutions.
Proper vehicle management.jpg
Storm Sewer System Maintenance Regularly clean debris from storm sewer inlets, remove sediment from catch basin sumps, and remove any illicit connections to storm sewer systems.
Storm sewer system maintenance.jpg
Sanitary Sewer System Maintenance 2 Regularly inspect and flush sanitary pipes to ensure that there are no leaks in the system and that the system is properly functioning.
Sanitary storm sewer maintenance.jpg


photo of storm sewer stenciling
Photo of storm sewer stenciling

Construction practices

Fact sheets

Photo credits

  1. Courtesy of the Center for Watershed Protection
  2. Courtesy of the Town of Amherst, New York
  3. Courtesy of the United States Geological Survey
  4. All other photos from Emmons and Olivier Resources

References

This page was last edited on 18 July 2022, at 20:12.