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Temporary construction erosion and sediment control is the practice of preventing or reducing the movement of sediment from a site during construction through the implementation of man-made structures, land management techniques, or natural processes. Note that this Fact Sheet does not contain detail on the use of specific BMPs. Because there are many good resources on erosion and sediment control, this Fact Sheet merely discusses their use and refers the reader to other useful resources for detail.
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{{alert|The information on this page is from the original Minnesota Stormwater Manual (2005). For updated information on construction stormwater best management practices we recommend the following links.|alert-warning}}
  
{{alert|You may link to the fact sheet from the original Minnesota Stormwater Manual at the following link: [[File:Temporary Construction Sediment and Erosion Control.docx]]|alert-info}}
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*[[Erosion prevention practices]] - Links to a page that provides a portal to information on individual erosion prevention practices
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*[[Sediment control practices]] - Links to a page that provides a portal to information on individual sediment control practices
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*[[General principles for erosion prevention and sediment control at construction sites in Minnesota]]
  
<font size=3>[[File:Example of vegetated buffers.jpg|thumb|300px|alt=photo showing an example of a vegetated buffer|Photo showing an example of a vegetated buffer]]</font size>
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Temporary construction erosion and sediment control is the practice of preventing or reducing the movement of sediment from a site during construction through the implementation of man-made structures, land management techniques, or natural processes. This page does not contain detail on the use of specific BMPs but instead merely discusses their use and refers the reader to other useful resources for detail.
 +
 
 +
<font size=3>[[File:Example of vegetated buffers.jpg|thumb|300px|alt=photo showing an example of a vegetated buffer|An example of a vegetated buffer adjacent to a construction site.]]</font size>
  
 
=='''Introduction'''==
 
=='''Introduction'''==
 
 
Temporary construction erosion and sediment control limits the amount of sediment that is carried into lakes, streams and rivers by storm water runoff. Sediment carries nutrients and pollutants that degrade water resources and harm aquatic wildlife. Proper planning of construction site activities greatly reduces the impact of soil disturbance activities on nearby resources and diminishes the need for costly restorations. A construction plan that limits sediment disturbance in potential problem areas and uses effective temporary sediment control practices will lessen negative impacts to local water resources and natural areas.
 
Temporary construction erosion and sediment control limits the amount of sediment that is carried into lakes, streams and rivers by storm water runoff. Sediment carries nutrients and pollutants that degrade water resources and harm aquatic wildlife. Proper planning of construction site activities greatly reduces the impact of soil disturbance activities on nearby resources and diminishes the need for costly restorations. A construction plan that limits sediment disturbance in potential problem areas and uses effective temporary sediment control practices will lessen negative impacts to local water resources and natural areas.
  
 
=='''Planning'''==
 
=='''Planning'''==
 
 
To establish a construction plan that will minimize sediment movement, designers will need information on existing site conditions and neighboring resources that require special consideration including water bodies, natural areas, bluffs and other highly erodible or sensitive areas. Construction activities should be designed in a manner that minimizes overall soil disturbance and phases areas of disturbance such that the amount of land disturbed at any one time is reduced. This type of planning will limit the need for larger structural sediment control solutions. Additionally, the designer should determine which local, state, and federal agencies require permits for the type of work planned. The site plan will need to account for the requirements of all agencies issuing permits.
 
To establish a construction plan that will minimize sediment movement, designers will need information on existing site conditions and neighboring resources that require special consideration including water bodies, natural areas, bluffs and other highly erodible or sensitive areas. Construction activities should be designed in a manner that minimizes overall soil disturbance and phases areas of disturbance such that the amount of land disturbed at any one time is reduced. This type of planning will limit the need for larger structural sediment control solutions. Additionally, the designer should determine which local, state, and federal agencies require permits for the type of work planned. The site plan will need to account for the requirements of all agencies issuing permits.
  
 
=='''Permits'''==
 
=='''Permits'''==
 
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Projects disturbing 1 acre or more of land or a common plan of development or sale that disturbs greater than 1 acre will require a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) [https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=2018_Minnesota_Construction_Stormwater_Permit Construction Stormwater Permit] from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA). The size threshold can be smaller if the site is a part of a “common plan of development or sale” and if the larger common plan will ultimately disturb more than 1 acre. The permit requires the establishment of a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) for the construction site.
Projects disturbing one acre or more of land or part of a common area that is disturbed will require a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Construction Stormwater Permit from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. The size threshold can be smaller if the site is a part of a “common plan of development or sale” and if the larger common plan will ultimately disturb more than one acre (see NPDES Construction General Permit). The permit requires the establishment of a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) for the construction site.
 
  
 
Other Minnesota agencies requiring permits typically might include watersheds, municipalities, and soil and water conservation districts.
 
Other Minnesota agencies requiring permits typically might include watersheds, municipalities, and soil and water conservation districts.
  
<font size=3>[[File:Site without temporary sediment control 1.jpg|thumb|300px|alt=photo showing a construction site with no sediment control practices|Photo showing a construction site with no sediment control practicesr]]</font size>
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<font size=3>[[File:Site without temporary sediment control 1.jpg|thumb|300px|alt=photo showing a construction site with no sediment control practices|Example of a construction site with no sediment control practicesr]]</font size>
  
<font size=3>[[File:Site with temporary sediment control 1.jpg|thumb|300px|alt=photo showing a construction site with sediment control practices|Photo showing a construction site with sediment control practices]]</font size>
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<font size=3>[[File:Site with temporary sediment control 1.jpg|thumb|300px|alt=photo showing a construction site with sediment control practices|Example of a construction site with sediment control practices]]</font size>
 
 
=='''Sequencing Activities'''==
 
  
 +
=='''Sequencing activities'''==
 
The practices included in the site plan and SWPPP will need to control runoff, stabilize slopes and exposed soils, and limit the movement of soils into drainage systems and natural areas. A key factor in accomplishing these goals is the sequencing of construction activities such that the minimum possible area is disturbed at any one time. Initial site work should include establishing protective buffer zones adjacent to onsite resources that require protection and setting up perimeter sediment controls.
 
The practices included in the site plan and SWPPP will need to control runoff, stabilize slopes and exposed soils, and limit the movement of soils into drainage systems and natural areas. A key factor in accomplishing these goals is the sequencing of construction activities such that the minimum possible area is disturbed at any one time. Initial site work should include establishing protective buffer zones adjacent to onsite resources that require protection and setting up perimeter sediment controls.
  
During the course of construction, a variety of erosion prevention and sediment control practices may be necessary in order to stabilize slopes and drainageways, protect inlets to the storm water conveyance system, limit gully formation, and capture sediment. Table 12.CONST.1 summarizes some of the most common temporary erosion and sediment control practices, the on-site areas to use the practices, and the method of use for each of the practices. Table 12.CONST.2 indicates NPDES requirements and the temporary sediment control practices that can be used to fulfill these requirements. Temporary seeding is not erosion protection or sediment control until vegetation is established or until the area is protected with an erosion control blanket. Projects that are actively under construction in winter/frozen months should include additional inspection and clean-up activities. Temporary sediment basins should be sized to include extra storage for snowmelt, as discussed in Chapter 9.
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During the course of construction, a variety of erosion prevention and sediment control practices may be necessary in order to stabilize slopes and drainageways, protect inlets to the storm water conveyance system, limit gully formation, and capture sediment. Several practices can be used as temporary erosion and sediment control practices and these can be used to meet NPDES requirements. Temporary seeding is not erosion protection or sediment control until vegetation is established or until the area is protected with an erosion control blanket. Projects that are actively under construction in winter/frozen months should include additional inspection and clean-up activities. Temporary sediment basins should be sized to include extra storage for [[Cold climate impact on runoff management|snowmelt]].
 
 
=='''Inspection and Maintenance'''==
 
  
 +
=='''Inspection and maintenance'''==
 
A final key element to ensure effectiveness of the erosion and sediment control plan is the implementation of an inspection and maintenance program. Frequent inspection and maintenance activities ensure that the installed temporary sediment control practices are operating effectively throughout the course of the project.  
 
A final key element to ensure effectiveness of the erosion and sediment control plan is the implementation of an inspection and maintenance program. Frequent inspection and maintenance activities ensure that the installed temporary sediment control practices are operating effectively throughout the course of the project.  
 
=='''References'''==
 
*[http://www.dot.state.mn.us/environment/pdf_files/SeedingManual2003.pdf|Minnesota Department of Transportation]. 2003. ''2003 Seeding Manual''.
 
*[http://www.dot.state.mn.us/tecsup/spec/|Minnesota Department of Transportation]. 2000. ''Mn/DOT Standard Specifications for Construction''.
 
*Minnesota Erosion Control Association and Minnesota Department of Transportation, 2001. Erosion & Sediment Control Certification & ETeam Training Program 2001. <nowiki>http://www.dot.state.mn.us/</nowiki>environment/pdf_files<nowiki>/TrnManCl.pd</nowiki>f
 
*[http://www.lrrb.gen.mn.us/pdf/200308.pdf|Minnesota Local Road Research Board], Federal Highway Administration, and Minnesota Department of Transportation. 2003. ''Erosion Control Handbook for Local Roads''. Manual Number 2003-08.
 
*Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, 2005. NPDES General Permit for Storm Water Discharges From Construction Activities. <nowiki>http://www.epa.gov/npdes/pubs/cgp2003_entirepermit.pdf</nowiki>
 
*Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, 2000. Protecting Water Quality in Urban Areas. <nowiki>http://www.pca.state.mn.us/water/pubs/sw-bmpmanual.html</nowiki>
 
*Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, 2004. Stormwater Compliance Assistance Toolkit for Small Construction Operators. <nowiki>http://www.pca.state.mn.us/publications/wq-strm2-09.pdf</nowiki>
 
  
 
=='''Overview of temporary sediment control practices'''==
 
=='''Overview of temporary sediment control practices'''==
<font size=3>[[File:Example of vegetated buffers.jpg|thumb|150px|alt=photo illustrating a vegetated buffer|Photo illustrating a vegetated buffer]]</font size>
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<font size=3>[[File:Example of vegetated buffers.jpg|thumb|200px|alt=photo illustrating a vegetated buffer|Photo illustrating a vegetated buffer]]</font size>
*Vegetated Buffers  
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*'''Vegetated Buffers'''
 
**Uses: erosion control
 
**Uses: erosion control
 
**Areas to Use
 
**Areas to Use
Line 53: Line 43:
 
**Method: Vegetated buffers are areas designated to remain undisturbed in order to protect trees, lakes, bluffs, or natural areas. Buffers should be marked and maintained around all resources requiring protection.
 
**Method: Vegetated buffers are areas designated to remain undisturbed in order to protect trees, lakes, bluffs, or natural areas. Buffers should be marked and maintained around all resources requiring protection.
  
 
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<font size=3>[[File:Example of silt fence.jpg|thumb|200px|alt=photo illustrating a silt fence|Photo illustrating a silt fence]]</font size>
 
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*'''Silt Fence'''
 
<font size=3>[[File:Example of silt fence.jpg|thumb|150px|alt=photo illustrating a silt fence|Photo illustrating a Silt Fence]]</font size>
 
*Silt Fence
 
 
**Uses: sediment control
 
**Uses: sediment control
 
**Areas to Use
 
**Areas to Use
Line 66: Line 53:
 
**Method: Silt fence filters sediment from runoff by allowing water to pass through a geotextile fabric or by creating a pool to allow sediment to drop out of the water column. Silt fence is installed primarily at downslope boundaries of the work area but can also be used for inlet protection, and around the perimeter of stockpiles
 
**Method: Silt fence filters sediment from runoff by allowing water to pass through a geotextile fabric or by creating a pool to allow sediment to drop out of the water column. Silt fence is installed primarily at downslope boundaries of the work area but can also be used for inlet protection, and around the perimeter of stockpiles
  
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<font size=3>[[File:Example of fiber log.jpg|thumb|200px|alt=photo illustrating a silt fence|Photo illustrating a fiber log]]</font size>
  
 
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* '''Fiber Log'''
<font size=3>[[File:Example of fiber log.jpg|thumb|150px|alt=photo illustrating a silt fence|Photo illustrating a Fiber Log]]</font size>
 
 
 
* Fiber Log  
 
 
** Areas to Use
 
** Areas to Use
 
*** Sediment Control
 
*** Sediment Control
Line 81: Line 66:
 
*** Fiber logs include straw, wood, or coconut fiber logs, compost logs, and rock logs that slow water and filter sediment. Fiber logs are used for inlet protection, ditch checks, and as perimeter control where silt fence is infeasible.
 
*** Fiber logs include straw, wood, or coconut fiber logs, compost logs, and rock logs that slow water and filter sediment. Fiber logs are used for inlet protection, ditch checks, and as perimeter control where silt fence is infeasible.
  
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<font size=3>[[File:Example of road construction entrance 1.jpg|thumb|200px|alt=photo illustrating a Rock Construction Entrance|Photo illustrating a rock construction entrance]]</font size>
  
 
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* '''Rock Construction Entrance'''
 
<font size=3>[[File:Example of road construction entrance 1.jpg|thumb|150px|alt=photo illustrating a Rock Construction Entrance|Photo illustrating a Rock Construction Entrance]]</font size>
 
 
 
* Rock Construction Entrance
 
 
** Areas to Use
 
** Areas to Use
 
*** Sediment Control
 
*** Sediment Control
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*** A rock construction entrance is a bed of rocks that helps to remove sediment from vehicle tires. Rock construction entrances should be placed at all site access points. The use of 1 1/2 inch – 3 inch clear aggregate is recommended. Periodic cleaning or replacement is recommended
 
*** A rock construction entrance is a bed of rocks that helps to remove sediment from vehicle tires. Rock construction entrances should be placed at all site access points. The use of 1 1/2 inch – 3 inch clear aggregate is recommended. Periodic cleaning or replacement is recommended
  
 
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* '''Grade Breaks'''
 
 
<font size=3>[[File:Example of grade breaks.jpg|thumb|150px|alt=photo illustrating Grade Breaks|Photo illustrating a Rock Construction Entrance]]</font size>
 
 
 
 
* Grade Breaks
 
 
** Areas to Use
 
** Areas to Use
 
*** Sediment Control
 
*** Sediment Control
Line 105: Line 82:
 
*** Grade breaks are changes in slope that break up concentrated flow, preventing the formation of gullies. Grade breaks should be incorporated into long slopes
 
*** Grade breaks are changes in slope that break up concentrated flow, preventing the formation of gullies. Grade breaks should be incorporated into long slopes
  
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<font size=3>[[File:Example of temporary seeding.jpg|thumb|200px|alt=photo illustrating Grade Breaks|Photo illustrating temporary seeding]]</font size>
  
 
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* '''Temporary Seeding'''
 
 
<font size=3>[[File:Example of temporary seeding.jpg|thumb|150px|alt=photo illustrating Grade Breaks|Photo illustrating Temporary Seeding]]</font size>
 
 
 
* Temporary Seeding
 
 
** Areas to Use
 
** Areas to Use
 
*** Erosion Protection
 
*** Erosion Protection
Line 120: Line 94:
 
*** Temporary seeding allows plants to stabilize the soil through vegetation and root growth. A large variety of plants are available for temporary seeding of different conditions; the most common are rye grass, winter wheat, and oats.
 
*** Temporary seeding allows plants to stabilize the soil through vegetation and root growth. A large variety of plants are available for temporary seeding of different conditions; the most common are rye grass, winter wheat, and oats.
  
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<font size=3>[[File:Example of erosion control blanket.jpg|thumb|200px|alt=photo illustrating Grade Breaks|Photo illustrating an erosion control blanket]]</font size>
  
 
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* '''Erosion Control Blanket'''
<font size=3>[[File:Example of erosion control blanket.jpg|thumb|150px|alt=photo illustrating Grade Breaks|Photo illustrating an Erosion Control Blanket]]</font size>
 
 
 
 
 
 
* Erosion Control Blanket
 
 
** Areas to Use
 
** Areas to Use
 
*** Erosion Protection
 
*** Erosion Protection
Line 134: Line 104:
 
*** Drainageways
 
*** Drainageways
 
** Method
 
** Method
*** Erosion control blanket is a mat made of netting layered with straw, wood, coconut or man-made fibers that prevents erosion by sheltering the soil from rainfall and runoff while holding moisture for establishing plants. Blankets are installed in channels o
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*** Erosion control blanket is a mat made of netting layered with straw, wood, coconut or man-made fibers that prevents erosion by sheltering the soil from rainfall and runoff while holding moisture for establishing plants. Blankets are installed in channels
 
 
  
<font size=3>[[File:Example of mulch road.jpg|thumb|150px|alt=photo illustrating Grade Breaks|Photo illustrating Mulch]]</font size>
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<font size=3>[[File:Example of mulch road.jpg|thumb|200px|alt=photo illustrating Grade Breaks|Photo illustrating mulch]]</font size>
  
 
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* '''Mulch'''
 
* Mulch
 
 
** Areas to Use
 
** Areas to Use
 
*** Erosion Protection
 
*** Erosion Protection
Line 148: Line 115:
 
*** Mulch is wood fibers, compost, wood chips, straw, or hay that is applied as a cover to disturbed soil. Mulch reduces erosion by absorbing energy from rainfall and runoff and provides protection and moisture for the establishment of vegetation, when properly disc anchored or spread.
 
*** Mulch is wood fibers, compost, wood chips, straw, or hay that is applied as a cover to disturbed soil. Mulch reduces erosion by absorbing energy from rainfall and runoff and provides protection and moisture for the establishment of vegetation, when properly disc anchored or spread.
  
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<font size=3>[[File:Erosion hydraulic mulch spraying.jpg|thumb|200px|alt=photo illustrating Hydraulic Mulch|Photo illustrating hydraulic mulch]]</font size>
  
 
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* '''Hydraulic Mulch'''
<font size=3>[[File:Erosion hydraulic mulch spraying.jpg|thumb|150px|alt=photo illustrating Hydraulic Mulch|Photo illustrating Mulch]]</font size>
 
 
 
 
 
 
* Hydraulic Mulch
 
 
** Areas to Use
 
** Areas to Use
 
*** Erosion Protection
 
*** Erosion Protection
Line 161: Line 124:
 
*** Hydraulic mulches for erosion control are typically comprised of wood fibers and are applied by hydroseeding equipment. Hydraulic mulches are typically used in areas with steeper slopes or where equipment access would be difficult.
 
*** Hydraulic mulches for erosion control are typically comprised of wood fibers and are applied by hydroseeding equipment. Hydraulic mulches are typically used in areas with steeper slopes or where equipment access would be difficult.
  
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<font size=3>[[File:Example of temporary down drain.jpg|thumb|200px|alt=photo illustrating Temporary Pipe Downdrains|Photo illustrating temporary down drains]]</font size>
  
# Temporary Pipe Downdrains
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* '''Temporary Pipe Downdrains'''
## Areas to Use
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** Areas to Use
### Erosion Protection
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*** Erosion Protection
### Slopes
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*** Slopes
## Method  
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** Method  
### A temporary pipe downdrain conveys runoff down slopes in a pipe so that runoff will not cause erosion. Pipe downdrains are installed where concentrated flow would drain onto a disturbed slope
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*** A temporary pipe downdrain conveys runoff down slopes in a pipe so that runoff will not cause erosion. Pipe downdrains are installed where concentrated flow would drain onto a disturbed slope
  
 +
<font size=3>[[File:Example of floatation silt curtain.jpg|thumb|200px|alt=photo illustrating Temporary Pipe Downdrains|Photo illustrating floatation silt curtain]]</font size>
  
# Floatation Silt Curtain
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* '''Floatation Silt Curtain'''
## Areas to Use
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** Areas to Use
### Sediment Control
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*** Sediment Control
### Other
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*** Other
#### Lakes, Wetlands, Streams  
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**** Lakes, Wetlands, Streams  
## Method
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** Method
### Floatation silt curtain is fabric fence installed in water bodies to contain sediment near the banks of the work area. Must be used in conjunction with other sediment control techniques
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*** Floatation silt curtain is fabric fence installed in water bodies to contain sediment near the banks of the work area. Must be used in conjunction with other sediment control techniques
  
 +
<font size=3>[[File:Example of rock bags.jpg|thumb|200px|alt=photo illustrating Temporary Pipe Downdrains|Photo illustrating rock bags]]</font size>
  
# Rock or Compost Bags
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* '''Rock or Compost Bags'''
## Areas to Use
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** Areas to Use
### Sediment Control
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*** Sediment Control
### Slopes
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*** Slopes
### Other
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*** Other
#### Drainage System Inlets
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**** Drainage System Inlets
## Method
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** Method
### Rock and compost bags are filled bags that are used to filter water, control ditch grade, or to provide inlet protection
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*** Rock and compost bags are filled bags that are used to filter water, control ditch grade, or to provide inlet protection
  
 +
<font size=3>[[File:Example of rock check dam.jpg|thumb|200px|alt=photo illustrating Temporary Pipe Downdrains|Photo illustrating rock check dam]]</font size>
  
# Rock Check Dam
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* '''Rock Check Dam'''
## Areas to Use
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** Areas to Use
### Sediment Control
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*** Sediment Control
### Drainageways
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*** Drainageways
## Method  
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** Method  
### Rock and compost bags are filled bags that are used to filter water, control ditch grade, or to provide inlet protection
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*** Rock check dams are rocks piled across a ditch to slow flows and capture sediment. Rock checks are installed perpendicular to flow and should be wide enough to ensure that flow remains in the center.
  
 +
<font size=3>[[File:Example of rip rap.jpg|thumb|200px|alt=photo illustrating Riprap|Photo illustrating riprap]]</font size>
  
# Riprap
+
* '''Riprap'''
## Areas to Use
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** Areas to Use
### Erosion Protection
+
*** Erosion Protection
### Other
+
*** Other
#### Drainage System Inlets
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**** Drainage System Inlets
## Method  
+
** Method  
### Riprap is appropriately sized rocks that reduce the energy of fast moving flows. Riprap is used along channels and at outfalls
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*** Riprap is appropriately sized rocks that reduce the energy of fast moving flows. Riprap is used along channels and at outfalls
  
 +
<font size=3>[[File:Site with temporary sediment control 1.jpg|thumb|200px|alt=photo illustrating a Temporary Sedimentation Basin|Photo illustrating rock check dam]]</font size>
  
# Temporary Sedimentation Basin
+
* '''Temporary Sedimentation Basin'''
## Areas to Use
+
** Areas to Use
### Sediment Control
+
*** Sediment Control
### Other
+
*** Other
#### Throughout Site
+
**** Throughout Site
## Method  
+
** Method  
### Temporary sedimentation basins are depressions that capture runoff to slow the flow of water and allow sediment to settle out
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*** Temporary sedimentation basins are depressions that capture runoff to slow the flow of water and allow sediment to settle out
  
 +
<font size=3>[[File:Example of filter bag.jpg|thumb|200px|alt=photo illustrating a Temporary Sedimentation Basin|Photo illustrating filter bag]]</font size>
  
# Filter Bag
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* '''Filter Bag'''
## Areas to Use
+
** Areas to Use
### Sediment Control
+
*** Sediment Control
### Other  
+
*** Other  
#### Drainage System Inlets
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**** Drainage System Inlets
## Method  
+
** Method  
### Filter bags are mesh bags that capture sediment but allow water to pass through. Filter bags are installed in storm drain inlets.
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*** Filter bags are mesh bags that capture sediment but allow water to pass through. Filter bags are installed in storm drain inlets.
  
 +
=='''References'''==
 +
*Minnesota Department of Transportation. 2003. [http://www.dot.state.mn.us/environment/erosion/pdf/native-seed-mix-dm.pdf 2003 Seeding Manual].
 +
*Minnesota Department of Transportation]. 2000. [http://www.dot.state.mn.us/pre-letting/spec/ Mn/DOT Standard Specifications for Construction].
 +
*Minnesota Erosion Control Association and Minnesota Department of Transportation, 2001. ''Erosion & Sediment Control Certification & ETeam Training Program 2001''.
 +
*Minnesota Local Road Research Board], Federal Highway Administration, and Minnesota Department of Transportation. 2003. [http://www.lrrb.org/media/reports/200308.pdf Erosion Control Handbook for Local Roads]. Manual Number 2003-08.
 +
*Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. [https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=2018_Minnesota_Construction_Stormwater_Permit 2018 NPDES General Permit for Storm Water Discharges From Construction Activities].
 +
*Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, 2000. [http://www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=728 Protecting Water Quality in Urban Areas].
 +
*Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, 2004. [http://www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/view-document.html?gid=7414 Stormwater Compliance Assistance Toolkit for Small Construction Operators].
 +
<noinclude>[[Category:BMP]]</noinclude>
  
'''NPDES General Construction Storm water Permit Requirement *'''
+
[[Category:References]]
 
 
*specific requirements may vary as specified in General Permit Appendix A
 
 
 
# Delineate areas of no disturbance before beginning site work.
 
## Vegetated Buffers
 
# Sediment control must be established on all down gradient perimeters prior to commencement of land disturbing activities.
 
# Silt Fence
 
## Fiber Log
 
# Vehicle tracking of sediment must be minimized.
 
## Rock Construction Entrance
 
# All storm drain inlets must be protected. .
 
## Silt Fence
 
## Fiber Log
 
# Install energy dissipation measures at pipe outlets within 24 hours of connecting to a surface water.
 
## Rockbags/Sandbags/ Compostbags
 
# Drainage ditches within 200 feet of a surface water or the property edge must be stabilized within 24 hours of connection to a surface water.
 
## Fiber Log
 
## Temporary Seeding
 
## Erosion Control Blanket
 
## <nowiki>*</nowiki>Mulch
 
## <nowiki>*</nowiki>Hydraulic Mulch
 
## Rock Check Dam
 
## Riprap
 
# No unbroken slope of length greater than 75 feet for slopes of 3:1 or steeper.
 
# Slopes within 200 feet of a surface water must have temporary protection or permanent cover within the following timeframe based on slope:
 
## Fiber Log
 
## Grade Breaks
 
## Temporary Seeding
 
## Erosion Control Blanket
 
## Mulch
 
## Hydraulic Mulch
 
## Temporary Pipe Downdrains
 
# '''Slope Time'''
 
## Steeper than 3:1 7 days
 
## 10:1 to 3:1 14 days
 
## Flatter than 10:1 21 days
 
# Install temporary basin where 10 acres or more drains to a common location.
 
## Sedimentation Basin
 
 
 
<nowiki>* Not recommended for a</nowiki>
 

Latest revision as of 13:32, 11 February 2019

Caution: The information on this page is from the original Minnesota Stormwater Manual (2005). For updated information on construction stormwater best management practices we recommend the following links.

Temporary construction erosion and sediment control is the practice of preventing or reducing the movement of sediment from a site during construction through the implementation of man-made structures, land management techniques, or natural processes. This page does not contain detail on the use of specific BMPs but instead merely discusses their use and refers the reader to other useful resources for detail.

photo showing an example of a vegetated buffer
An example of a vegetated buffer adjacent to a construction site.

Introduction

Temporary construction erosion and sediment control limits the amount of sediment that is carried into lakes, streams and rivers by storm water runoff. Sediment carries nutrients and pollutants that degrade water resources and harm aquatic wildlife. Proper planning of construction site activities greatly reduces the impact of soil disturbance activities on nearby resources and diminishes the need for costly restorations. A construction plan that limits sediment disturbance in potential problem areas and uses effective temporary sediment control practices will lessen negative impacts to local water resources and natural areas.

Planning

To establish a construction plan that will minimize sediment movement, designers will need information on existing site conditions and neighboring resources that require special consideration including water bodies, natural areas, bluffs and other highly erodible or sensitive areas. Construction activities should be designed in a manner that minimizes overall soil disturbance and phases areas of disturbance such that the amount of land disturbed at any one time is reduced. This type of planning will limit the need for larger structural sediment control solutions. Additionally, the designer should determine which local, state, and federal agencies require permits for the type of work planned. The site plan will need to account for the requirements of all agencies issuing permits.

Permits

Projects disturbing 1 acre or more of land or a common plan of development or sale that disturbs greater than 1 acre will require a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Construction Stormwater Permit from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA). The size threshold can be smaller if the site is a part of a “common plan of development or sale” and if the larger common plan will ultimately disturb more than 1 acre. The permit requires the establishment of a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) for the construction site.

Other Minnesota agencies requiring permits typically might include watersheds, municipalities, and soil and water conservation districts.

photo showing a construction site with no sediment control practices
Example of a construction site with no sediment control practicesr
photo showing a construction site with sediment control practices
Example of a construction site with sediment control practices

Sequencing activities

The practices included in the site plan and SWPPP will need to control runoff, stabilize slopes and exposed soils, and limit the movement of soils into drainage systems and natural areas. A key factor in accomplishing these goals is the sequencing of construction activities such that the minimum possible area is disturbed at any one time. Initial site work should include establishing protective buffer zones adjacent to onsite resources that require protection and setting up perimeter sediment controls.

During the course of construction, a variety of erosion prevention and sediment control practices may be necessary in order to stabilize slopes and drainageways, protect inlets to the storm water conveyance system, limit gully formation, and capture sediment. Several practices can be used as temporary erosion and sediment control practices and these can be used to meet NPDES requirements. Temporary seeding is not erosion protection or sediment control until vegetation is established or until the area is protected with an erosion control blanket. Projects that are actively under construction in winter/frozen months should include additional inspection and clean-up activities. Temporary sediment basins should be sized to include extra storage for snowmelt.

Inspection and maintenance

A final key element to ensure effectiveness of the erosion and sediment control plan is the implementation of an inspection and maintenance program. Frequent inspection and maintenance activities ensure that the installed temporary sediment control practices are operating effectively throughout the course of the project.

Overview of temporary sediment control practices

photo illustrating a vegetated buffer
Photo illustrating a vegetated buffer
  • Vegetated Buffers
    • Uses: erosion control
    • Areas to Use
      • Perimeter
      • Slopes
      • Drainageways
      • Around Trees, Water Bodies, Natural Areas
    • Method: Vegetated buffers are areas designated to remain undisturbed in order to protect trees, lakes, bluffs, or natural areas. Buffers should be marked and maintained around all resources requiring protection.
photo illustrating a silt fence
Photo illustrating a silt fence
  • Silt Fence
    • Uses: sediment control
    • Areas to Use
      • Perimeter
      • Slopes
      • Drainageways
      • Other: Drainage System Inlets
    • Method: Silt fence filters sediment from runoff by allowing water to pass through a geotextile fabric or by creating a pool to allow sediment to drop out of the water column. Silt fence is installed primarily at downslope boundaries of the work area but can also be used for inlet protection, and around the perimeter of stockpiles
photo illustrating a silt fence
Photo illustrating a fiber log
  • Fiber Log
    • Areas to Use
      • Sediment Control
      • Perimeter
      • Slopes
      • Drainageways
      • Other
        • Drainage System Inlets
    • Method
      • Fiber logs include straw, wood, or coconut fiber logs, compost logs, and rock logs that slow water and filter sediment. Fiber logs are used for inlet protection, ditch checks, and as perimeter control where silt fence is infeasible.
photo illustrating a Rock Construction Entrance
Photo illustrating a rock construction entrance
  • Rock Construction Entrance
    • Areas to Use
      • Sediment Control
      • Perimeter
    • Method
      • A rock construction entrance is a bed of rocks that helps to remove sediment from vehicle tires. Rock construction entrances should be placed at all site access points. The use of 1 1/2 inch – 3 inch clear aggregate is recommended. Periodic cleaning or replacement is recommended
  • Grade Breaks
    • Areas to Use
      • Sediment Control
      • Slopes
    • Method
      • Grade breaks are changes in slope that break up concentrated flow, preventing the formation of gullies. Grade breaks should be incorporated into long slopes
photo illustrating Grade Breaks
Photo illustrating temporary seeding
  • Temporary Seeding
    • Areas to Use
      • Erosion Protection
      • Sediment Control
      • Perimeter
      • Slopes
      • Drainageways
    • Method
      • Temporary seeding allows plants to stabilize the soil through vegetation and root growth. A large variety of plants are available for temporary seeding of different conditions; the most common are rye grass, winter wheat, and oats.
photo illustrating Grade Breaks
Photo illustrating an erosion control blanket
  • Erosion Control Blanket
    • Areas to Use
      • Erosion Protection
      • Sediment Control
      • Perimeter
      • Slopes
      • Drainageways
    • Method
      • Erosion control blanket is a mat made of netting layered with straw, wood, coconut or man-made fibers that prevents erosion by sheltering the soil from rainfall and runoff while holding moisture for establishing plants. Blankets are installed in channels
photo illustrating Grade Breaks
Photo illustrating mulch
  • Mulch
    • Areas to Use
      • Erosion Protection
      • Slopes
    • Method
      • Mulch is wood fibers, compost, wood chips, straw, or hay that is applied as a cover to disturbed soil. Mulch reduces erosion by absorbing energy from rainfall and runoff and provides protection and moisture for the establishment of vegetation, when properly disc anchored or spread.
photo illustrating Hydraulic Mulch
Photo illustrating hydraulic mulch
  • Hydraulic Mulch
    • Areas to Use
      • Erosion Protection
      • Slopes
    • Method
      • Hydraulic mulches for erosion control are typically comprised of wood fibers and are applied by hydroseeding equipment. Hydraulic mulches are typically used in areas with steeper slopes or where equipment access would be difficult.
photo illustrating Temporary Pipe Downdrains
Photo illustrating temporary down drains
  • Temporary Pipe Downdrains
    • Areas to Use
      • Erosion Protection
      • Slopes
    • Method
      • A temporary pipe downdrain conveys runoff down slopes in a pipe so that runoff will not cause erosion. Pipe downdrains are installed where concentrated flow would drain onto a disturbed slope
photo illustrating Temporary Pipe Downdrains
Photo illustrating floatation silt curtain
  • Floatation Silt Curtain
    • Areas to Use
      • Sediment Control
      • Other
        • Lakes, Wetlands, Streams
    • Method
      • Floatation silt curtain is fabric fence installed in water bodies to contain sediment near the banks of the work area. Must be used in conjunction with other sediment control techniques
photo illustrating Temporary Pipe Downdrains
Photo illustrating rock bags
  • Rock or Compost Bags
    • Areas to Use
      • Sediment Control
      • Slopes
      • Other
        • Drainage System Inlets
    • Method
      • Rock and compost bags are filled bags that are used to filter water, control ditch grade, or to provide inlet protection
photo illustrating Temporary Pipe Downdrains
Photo illustrating rock check dam
  • Rock Check Dam
    • Areas to Use
      • Sediment Control
      • Drainageways
    • Method
      • Rock check dams are rocks piled across a ditch to slow flows and capture sediment. Rock checks are installed perpendicular to flow and should be wide enough to ensure that flow remains in the center.
photo illustrating Riprap
Photo illustrating riprap
  • Riprap
    • Areas to Use
      • Erosion Protection
      • Other
        • Drainage System Inlets
    • Method
      • Riprap is appropriately sized rocks that reduce the energy of fast moving flows. Riprap is used along channels and at outfalls
photo illustrating a Temporary Sedimentation Basin
Photo illustrating rock check dam
  • Temporary Sedimentation Basin
    • Areas to Use
      • Sediment Control
      • Other
        • Throughout Site
    • Method
      • Temporary sedimentation basins are depressions that capture runoff to slow the flow of water and allow sediment to settle out
photo illustrating a Temporary Sedimentation Basin
Photo illustrating filter bag
  • Filter Bag
    • Areas to Use
      • Sediment Control
      • Other
        • Drainage System Inlets
    • Method
      • Filter bags are mesh bags that capture sediment but allow water to pass through. Filter bags are installed in storm drain inlets.

References

This page was last edited on 11 February 2019, at 13:32.

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