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<td>Solid deicers work by lowering the freezing point of water, creating a brine with the chloride that bores through snow and ice and breaks the bond between ice and the pavement. The exact choice of ice melt product to use is dependent upon the temperature, current conditions and moisture or precipitation. Rock salt will melt ice to around 15 degrees. For a comparison of different deicers, [[Summary of properties of deicing agents|see this table]]</td>
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<td>Deicers work by lowering the freeze point of water.  There are many factors to be considered when choosing a deicer, one of the most important factors is the pavement temperature and pavement temperature trend.    For example, Rock salt can melt to -6 <sup>o</sup>F pavement temperatures but the colder the pavement the slower it works.  A best practice is to avoid using dry rock salt at pavement temperatures below 15 <sup>o</sup>F because it is too slow. The most common approach to speed up the melting processes is to add a liquid deicer to your granular product or use straight liquids (DLA - Direct Liquid Application).  Liquids are much faster acting than granular products.  They type and gradation of your granular product also will influence the speed of melting.  If you commonly have salt left on dry pavement after the snow is gone  it is time to revisit your strategies.  One easy step is to attend the smart salting training classes where you will learn more about deicer selection and application rates.  [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4IuHRlBkxY&list=PLurY2WfsVWKn9ismDC4Uz3IbRivAnf0Ld&index=11&t=0s Link to smart salting training calendar]. For a comparison of different deicers, [[Summary of properties of deicing agents|see this table]]</td>
 
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[[file:Ice melting from road salt.png|300px|thumb|alt=image of ice melting from salt|<font size=3>Deicers lower the freezing point of water, resulting in melting of ice when weather conditions are favorable.</font size>]]
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Winter weather conditions in Minnesota can cause icy roads and walkways, leading to dangerous conditions for drivers and pedestrians. In order to combat this situation, municipalities, businesses, and individuals often employ the use of deicers. A deicer is a substance that melts or prevents the formation of ice, and does so by lowering the freezing point of water and preventing a bond between ice and paved surfaces. A study by Marquette University found that deicing roads with salt reduces accidents by 88 percent and injuries by 85 percent ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance Kuemmel and Hanbali, 1992]).
  
Winter weather conditions in Minnesota can cause icy roads and walkways, leading to dangerous conditions for drivers and pedestrians. In order to combat this situation, municipalities, businesses, and individuals often employ the use of deicers. A deicer is a substance that melts or prevents the formation of ice, and does so by lowering the freezing point of water and preventing a bond between ice and paved surfaces. Sodium chloride for example, which is one of the most commonly used deicing agents, can be used to reduce the freezing point of water to 15°F ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance Local Road Research Board, 2012]).  A study by Marquette University found that deicing roads with salt reduces accidents by 88 percent and injuries by 85 percent ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance Kuemmel and Hanbali, 1992]).
+
While deicers have the ability to greatly improve road and walkway safety, they can also have negative effects on the [http://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/Environmental_impacts_of_road_salt_and_other_de-icing_chemicals environment] and [http://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/Other_impacts_of_road_salt_use surrounding infrastructure]. Once applied, deicers move with melt water to our surface and groundwater. In addition, some deicers are corrosive and will negatively impact roads, bridges, and other structures, as well as automobiles. Efforts are underway to minimize these environmental and infrastructure impacts, including optimizing deicer application and using of alternative deicing chemicals. Despite these negative effects, the benefits of deicers to public safety ensures they will be utilized for years to come.
  
While deicers have the ability to greatly improve road and walkway safety, they can also have negative effects on the [http://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/Environmental_impacts_of_road_salt_and_other_de-icing_chemicals environment] and [http://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/Other_impacts_of_road_salt_use surrounding infrastructure]. Once applied, deicers dissolved in the melting snow and ice are carried away with runoff to surface and/or groundwater. In addition, some deicers are corrosive and will negatively impact roads, bridges, and other structures, as well as automobiles. Efforts are underway to minimize these environmental and infrastructure impacts, including optimizing deicer application and using of alternative deicing chemicals. Despite these negative effects, the benefits of deicers to public safety ensures they will be utilized for years to come.
+
The Iowa Department of Transportation prepared a winter maintenance training series that includes a video titled [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4IuHRlBkxY&list=PLurY2WfsVWKn9ismDC4Uz3IbRivAnf0Ld&index=11&t=0s How Deicing Chemicals Work].
  
The Iowa Department of Transportation prepared a winter maintenance training series that includes a video titled [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oq9mrTxrrDI How Deicing Chemicals Work].
+
A list of the chemicals approved for use in deicing by the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) can be found [http://www.dot.state.mn.us/products/snow_ice/index.html here]. [https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=Environmental_impacts_of_road_salt_and_other_de-icing_chemicals Link here] for a discussion on environmental impacts of deicers and deicing additives.
  
==Overview of Deicing Chemicals==
+
==Chlorides==
Several different types of deicing chemicals exist. Those covered in this section include chloride-based deicers, acetate-based deicers, and carbohydrates. A list of the chemicals approved for use by the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) can be found [http://www.dot.state.mn.us/products/snow_ice/index.html here].
+
The chloride-based deicers discussed in this section are sodium chloride (NaCl), magnesium chloride (MgCl2), and calcium chloride (CaCl2). In general, chloride-based deicers are the least expensive and most used deicers on the market.
  
===Chlorides===
+
:'''Sodium Chloride'''. Sodium chloride is the most common deicer used in Minnesota and across the U.S. (Sleeper, 2013). The Water Resources Center at UMN estimates that 403,600 tons of road salt are used each season in Minnesota, and that 249,100 tons of road salt are used in the TCMA (Overbo et al. 2019). Sodium chloride(rock salt) is a granular product. It is used to make brine (liquid sodium chloride) and there are many additives that can be mixed into brine to enhance its performance. The lowest practical melting temperature for dry rock salt is 15 degree pavement temperature ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S Local Road Research Board, 2012]).  
The chloride-based deicers discussed in this section are sodium chloride (NaCl), magnesium chloride (MgCl2), and calcium chloride (CaCl2). In general, chloride-based deicers are the least expensive deicers on the market.
 
  
:'''Sodium Chloride'''. Sodium chloride is the most common deicer used in Minnesota and across the U.S. (Sleeper, 2013). In the Twin Cities Metro Area (TCMA) alone, it is estimated that 349,000 tons of sodium chloride is used each year ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S Sander et al., 2007]). Sodium chloride is usually sold as a solid, though it can be purchased as a pre-wetted or brine solution. The lowest practical melting temperature is 15°F ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S Local Road Research Board, 2012]).  
+
:'''Magnesium Chloride'''. Magnesium chloride can be purchased as either flakes, pellets, or a liquid. Magnesium chloride’s lowest practical melting pavement temperature is -10°F.  
  
:'''Magnesium Chloride'''. Magnesium chloride can be purchased as either flakes, pellets, or a liquid, and is often wetted and added to sodium chloride to help improve deicing performance. Magnesium chloride’s lowest practical melting temperature is -10°F.  
+
:'''Calcium Chloride'''. Calcium chloride can be purchased as either flakes, pellets, or as a liquid. Its lowest practical melting pavement temperature is -20°F (Local Road Research Board, 2012).
  
:'''Calcium Chloride'''. Calcium chloride can be purchased as either flakes, pellets, or as a liquid, and is often wetted and added to sodium chloride to improve deicing performance. Its lowest practical melting temperature is -20°F (Local Road Research Board, 2012). Calcium chloride is also corrosive.
+
:'''Complex Chloride Minerals''': These are products mined from the earth that are not pure rock salt but rather have a variety of other minerals mixed in. Overall they have been shown to increase performance in colder pavement temperatures as compared to rock salt. [ http://clearroads.org/wp-content/uploads/dlm_uploads/FinalReport_CR.13-02_Revised-Apr16_with-cover.pdf Chloride Liquid Agricultural By-Products and Solid Complex Chloride/Mineral Products].
  
===Acetates===
+
==Non-chloride deicers - Acetates==
 
Acetate-based deicers are often used in areas where the use of chloride-based deicers is limited. Acetate-based deicers include calcium-magnesium acetate (CMA), potassium acetate (KAc), and sodium acetate (NaAc). Much of the information provided here is based on studies and experiences using CMA.
 
Acetate-based deicers are often used in areas where the use of chloride-based deicers is limited. Acetate-based deicers include calcium-magnesium acetate (CMA), potassium acetate (KAc), and sodium acetate (NaAc). Much of the information provided here is based on studies and experiences using CMA.
  
Line 41: Line 40:
 
*Potentially results in anoxic conditions as they break down ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S Levelton Consultants Ltd., 2008]).
 
*Potentially results in anoxic conditions as they break down ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S Levelton Consultants Ltd., 2008]).
 
*Requires more material relative to salt to get comparable ice melting. An extra 20 to 70 percent more by weight is estimated to be needed ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S NRC, 1991]).
 
*Requires more material relative to salt to get comparable ice melting. An extra 20 to 70 percent more by weight is estimated to be needed ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S NRC, 1991]).
*Does not perform as well as chloride based deicers at temperatures below -5°C during heavy snowfall and freezing rain events ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S NRC, 1991]).
+
*Does not perform as well as chloride based deicers at pavement temperatures below -5°C during heavy snowfall and freezing rain events ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S NRC, 1991]).
  
 
Acetates include the following.
 
Acetates include the following.
*Calcium-magnesium acetate (CMA). CMA is probably the most common acetate-based deicer. It can be purchased as either a powder, crystals, pellets, or liquids. CMA has a lowest practical melting temperature of 20°F ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S Local Road Research Board, 2012]).
+
*Calcium-magnesium acetate (CMA). CMA is probably the most common acetate-based deicer. It can be purchased as either a powder, crystals, pellets, or liquids. CMA has a lowest practical melting pavement temperature of 20°F ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S Local Road Research Board, 2012]).
*Potassium Acetate (KAc). KAc is usually purchased as a liquid and has a lowest practical melting temperature of -15°F ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S Local Road Research Board, 2012]).
+
*Potassium Acetate (KAc). KAc is usually purchased as a liquid and has a lowest practical melting pavement temperature of -15°F ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S Local Road Research Board, 2012]).
  
===Carbohydrates===
+
==Non-chloride deicers - Waste stream products==
Carbohydrate-based deicers are often made from the fermentation of grains or the processing of sugars such as cane or beet sugar ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S Rubin et al., 2010]). Small quantities of carbohydrates are sometimes used with other deicers. Alone, carbohydrates do not aid in melting ice or snow; however, their use can help reduce the freezing point of ice further than salt and can help salt stick better to the road surface (Fortin et al, 2014; [https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S Rhodan and Sanburn, 2014]).
+
Other deicer options include free or low-cost cheese brine, pickle juice or other industry by-products on your surfaces for anti-icing or deicing. However, these should not be used without taking appropriate steps. Steps to take before using a waste stream product include but are not limited to the following [https://openprairie.sdstate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2107&context=etd].
Carbohydrates are not corrosive to steel, and at high concentrations, carbohydrates can act as a corrosion inhibitor for salt brines.  
 
  
There is evidence that the use of carbohydrates in the United States is increasing. For example, sales of a beet based product called Beet Heet were around 900,000 gallons at the end of the winter season in 2013. By February of 2014, 1.5 million gallons of Beet Heet had been sold. The Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Il uses beet juice in their deicers. The beet juice additive has minimal environmental affects, and helps the salt stick where applied. With the addition of beet juice, the arboretum is using nine times less salt, and saving an estimated $14,000 in material costs ([http://www.mortonarb.org/news/news-release-unusual-ingredient-making-easier-work-snow-removal-morton-arboretum-beet-juice The Morton Arboretum, 2014]). Another unconventional additive that has been used is cheese brine. Wisconsin has used a cheese brine in at least six counties in the state (Rodan and Sanburn, 2014).
+
#Determine if each batch of the waste product is consistent in chemical make up
 +
#Determine the side effects of this product
 +
#Determine what must be blended with it and in what amount to achieve optimal performance
 +
#Get approval to apply it in your area
 +
#Test it in a small area and learn how it works
  
[https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S Fu et al. (2012)] looked at two beet molasses-based deicers in comparison with a salt brine deicer. When used as a prewetting material, there was no statistically significant difference between any of the chemicals. When used as an anti-icing material, the organic material performed 30% better.
+
[https://openprairie.sdstate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2107&context=etd Link here for additional information]
 +
 
 +
==Carbohydrates==
 +
Carbohydrate are an additive to deicers and are an agricultural product often made from the fermentation of grains or the processing of sugars such as cane or beet sugar ([https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S Rubin et al., 2010]). Small quantities of carbohydrates are sometimes used with other deicers.
 +
 
 +
There are pros and cons about blending an agricultural additive into your brine or rock salt. Alone, carbohydrates do not aid in melting ice or snow. Agricultural products may have short term negative environmental impacts, including noticeable algal blooms or fish kills. However, mixed into chloride products, they have the potential to reduce deicer application rates and increase deicer performance for a variety of situations. The most common positive aspects of these additives include the following (Fortin et al, 2014; [https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php?title=References_for_Smart_Salting_%28S2%29_and_road_salt_winter_maintenance#S Rhodan and Sanburn, 2014]).
 +
*interference with ice crystal formation
 +
*reducing the freeze point of your brine
 +
*increased "sticking" to surfaces
 +
*reducing corrosion
 +
 
 +
For information on this topic, see ''Understanding the Effectiveness of Non-Chloride Liquid Agricultural By-Products and Solid Complex Chloride/Mineral Products'' [http://clearroads.org/wp-content/uploads/dlm_uploads/FinalReport_CR.13-02_Revised-Apr16_with-cover.pdf at the ClearRoads website].
  
 
==Summary==
 
==Summary==

Latest revision as of 18:58, 21 May 2020

How do deicers work?
Deicers work by lowering the freeze point of water. There are many factors to be considered when choosing a deicer, one of the most important factors is the pavement temperature and pavement temperature trend. For example, Rock salt can melt to -6 oF pavement temperatures but the colder the pavement the slower it works. A best practice is to avoid using dry rock salt at pavement temperatures below 15 oF because it is too slow. The most common approach to speed up the melting processes is to add a liquid deicer to your granular product or use straight liquids (DLA - Direct Liquid Application). Liquids are much faster acting than granular products. They type and gradation of your granular product also will influence the speed of melting. If you commonly have salt left on dry pavement after the snow is gone it is time to revisit your strategies. One easy step is to attend the smart salting training classes where you will learn more about deicer selection and application rates. Link to smart salting training calendar. For a comparison of different deicers, see this table

Winter weather conditions in Minnesota can cause icy roads and walkways, leading to dangerous conditions for drivers and pedestrians. In order to combat this situation, municipalities, businesses, and individuals often employ the use of deicers. A deicer is a substance that melts or prevents the formation of ice, and does so by lowering the freezing point of water and preventing a bond between ice and paved surfaces. A study by Marquette University found that deicing roads with salt reduces accidents by 88 percent and injuries by 85 percent (Kuemmel and Hanbali, 1992).

While deicers have the ability to greatly improve road and walkway safety, they can also have negative effects on the environment and surrounding infrastructure. Once applied, deicers move with melt water to our surface and groundwater. In addition, some deicers are corrosive and will negatively impact roads, bridges, and other structures, as well as automobiles. Efforts are underway to minimize these environmental and infrastructure impacts, including optimizing deicer application and using of alternative deicing chemicals. Despite these negative effects, the benefits of deicers to public safety ensures they will be utilized for years to come.

The Iowa Department of Transportation prepared a winter maintenance training series that includes a video titled How Deicing Chemicals Work.

A list of the chemicals approved for use in deicing by the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) can be found here. Link here for a discussion on environmental impacts of deicers and deicing additives.

Chlorides

The chloride-based deicers discussed in this section are sodium chloride (NaCl), magnesium chloride (MgCl2), and calcium chloride (CaCl2). In general, chloride-based deicers are the least expensive and most used deicers on the market.

Sodium Chloride. Sodium chloride is the most common deicer used in Minnesota and across the U.S. (Sleeper, 2013). The Water Resources Center at UMN estimates that 403,600 tons of road salt are used each season in Minnesota, and that 249,100 tons of road salt are used in the TCMA (Overbo et al. 2019). Sodium chloride(rock salt) is a granular product. It is used to make brine (liquid sodium chloride) and there are many additives that can be mixed into brine to enhance its performance. The lowest practical melting temperature for dry rock salt is 15 degree pavement temperature (Local Road Research Board, 2012).
Magnesium Chloride. Magnesium chloride can be purchased as either flakes, pellets, or a liquid. Magnesium chloride’s lowest practical melting pavement temperature is -10°F.
Calcium Chloride. Calcium chloride can be purchased as either flakes, pellets, or as a liquid. Its lowest practical melting pavement temperature is -20°F (Local Road Research Board, 2012).
Complex Chloride Minerals: These are products mined from the earth that are not pure rock salt but rather have a variety of other minerals mixed in. Overall they have been shown to increase performance in colder pavement temperatures as compared to rock salt. [ http://clearroads.org/wp-content/uploads/dlm_uploads/FinalReport_CR.13-02_Revised-Apr16_with-cover.pdf Chloride Liquid Agricultural By-Products and Solid Complex Chloride/Mineral Products].

Non-chloride deicers - Acetates

Acetate-based deicers are often used in areas where the use of chloride-based deicers is limited. Acetate-based deicers include calcium-magnesium acetate (CMA), potassium acetate (KAc), and sodium acetate (NaAc). Much of the information provided here is based on studies and experiences using CMA.

Advantages of acetates include the following.

Disadvantages of acetates include the following.

  • Reacts with and corrodes zinc so it would affect galvanized steel (Fortin, et al 2014).
  • Potentially results in anoxic conditions as they break down (Levelton Consultants Ltd., 2008).
  • Requires more material relative to salt to get comparable ice melting. An extra 20 to 70 percent more by weight is estimated to be needed (NRC, 1991).
  • Does not perform as well as chloride based deicers at pavement temperatures below -5°C during heavy snowfall and freezing rain events (NRC, 1991).

Acetates include the following.

  • Calcium-magnesium acetate (CMA). CMA is probably the most common acetate-based deicer. It can be purchased as either a powder, crystals, pellets, or liquids. CMA has a lowest practical melting pavement temperature of 20°F (Local Road Research Board, 2012).
  • Potassium Acetate (KAc). KAc is usually purchased as a liquid and has a lowest practical melting pavement temperature of -15°F (Local Road Research Board, 2012).

Non-chloride deicers - Waste stream products

Other deicer options include free or low-cost cheese brine, pickle juice or other industry by-products on your surfaces for anti-icing or deicing. However, these should not be used without taking appropriate steps. Steps to take before using a waste stream product include but are not limited to the following [1].

  1. Determine if each batch of the waste product is consistent in chemical make up
  2. Determine the side effects of this product
  3. Determine what must be blended with it and in what amount to achieve optimal performance
  4. Get approval to apply it in your area
  5. Test it in a small area and learn how it works

Link here for additional information

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrate are an additive to deicers and are an agricultural product often made from the fermentation of grains or the processing of sugars such as cane or beet sugar (Rubin et al., 2010). Small quantities of carbohydrates are sometimes used with other deicers.

There are pros and cons about blending an agricultural additive into your brine or rock salt. Alone, carbohydrates do not aid in melting ice or snow. Agricultural products may have short term negative environmental impacts, including noticeable algal blooms or fish kills. However, mixed into chloride products, they have the potential to reduce deicer application rates and increase deicer performance for a variety of situations. The most common positive aspects of these additives include the following (Fortin et al, 2014; Rhodan and Sanburn, 2014).

  • interference with ice crystal formation
  • reducing the freeze point of your brine
  • increased "sticking" to surfaces
  • reducing corrosion

For information on this topic, see Understanding the Effectiveness of Non-Chloride Liquid Agricultural By-Products and Solid Complex Chloride/Mineral Products at the ClearRoads website.

Summary

Table summarizing of properties of deicing agents. Adapted from Local Road Research Board, 2012, Ketcham et al., 1996 and Levelton Consultants Ltd., 2008.
Link to this table

Category Type Lowest Practical Melting Pavement Temperature 1,2 Potential for corrosion impairment3 Environmental Impact3
Atmospheric Corrosion to Metals Concrete Matrix Concrete Reinforcing Water Quality/Aquatic Live Air Quality Soils Vegetation
Chloride Based Deicers Sodium Chloride 15°F High; will initiate and accelerate corrosion Low/moderate; Will exacerbate scaling; low risk of paste attack High: Will initiate corrosion of rebar Moderate: Excessive chloride loading/metals contaminants; ferrocyanide additives Low: Leads to reduced abrasives use Moderate/High: Sodium accumulation breaks down soil structure and decreases permeability and soil stability; potential for metals to mobilize High: Spray causes foliage damage; osmotic stress harms roots, chloride toxicosis
Calcium Chloride -20°F High; Will initiate and accelerate corrosion; higher potential for corrosion related to hydroscopic properties Low/moderate; Will exacerbate scaling; low risk of paste attack High: Will initiate corrosion of rebar Moderate: Excessive chloride loading; heavy metal contamination Low: Leads to reduced abrasives use Low/Moderate: Improves soil structure; increases permeability; potential for metals to mobilize High: Spray causes foliage damage; osmotic stress harms roots, chloride toxicosis
Magnesium Chloride -10°F High; Will initiate and accelerate corrosion; higher potential for corrosion related to hydroscopic properties Moderate/high: Will exacerbate scaling; risk of paste deterioration from magnesium High: Will initiate corrosion of rebar, evidence suggest MgCl2 has the highest potential for corrosion of chloride produces Moderate: Excessive chloride loading; heavy metal contamination Low: Leads to reduced abrasives Low/Moderate: Improves soil structure; increases permeability; potential for metals to mobilize High: Spray causes foliage damage; osmotic stress harms roots, chloride toxicosis
Acetate Based Deicers Calcium Magnesium Acetate 20°F Low/moderate; Potential to initiate and accelerate corrosion due to elevated conductivity Moderate/high: Will exacerbate scaling; risk of pate deterioration from magnesium reactions Low; probably little or no effect High: Organic content leading to oxygen demand Low: Leads to reduced abrasives use Low/Moderate: Improves soil structure; increases permeability; potential for metals to mobilize Low: Little or no adverse effect; osmotic stress at high levels
Potassium Acetate -15°F Low/moderate; Potential to initiate and accelerate corrosion due to elevated conductivity Low; probably little or no effect High: Organic content leading to oxygen demand Low: Leads to reduced abrasives use
Sodium Acetate -20°F
Carbohydrates Beet Juice NA Low; Potential to initiate and accelerate corrosion due to elevated conductivity clams of mitigation of corrosion require further evaluation Low; Probably little or no effect Low; Probably little or no effect; claims of mitigation of corrosion require further evaluation High Organic matter leading to oxygen demand; nutrient enrichment by phosphorus and nitrogen; heavy metals Low: Leads to reduced abrasive use Low: Probably little or no effect; limited information available Low: Probably little or no effect
Molasses NA
Corn Syrup NA



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